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THE BOHEMIANS IN PORTUGAL

Another year, another country, another adventure. The Bohemian had been before but not with Mrs Bohemian, so off it was on a Friday afternoon on a flight from the Rocky Mountains to Lisboa, capitol of Portugal. Our hotel, the Marques du Pombal, was right in the heart of Lisboa on the Avenida  da Liberdade, a perfect place to start a walking journey. A relaxing lunch on the Avenida was followed by a journey to find the Chiado district, which is known as one of the bohemian districts bordering Lisbon. We did discover that the Bohemian remembered enough Portuguese to ask directions once or twice, and we found our objective: the oldest bookstore in the world. The Bertrand has been around since 1732.

 

The Basilica in Fatima

The next day was another exploring day: the Alfama district, the oldest area of Lisbon, which wasn’t destroyed by the earthquake in the 18th century. The Alfama district is a World Heritage Site; I think it is unique in that you find a restaurant every 20 feet, on streets so narrow you could touch the buildings on each side of the street. Up next was Jeronimos, the monastery in Belem, and a quiet little port tasting on the riverside next to the Torre de Belem. Jeronimos was impressive, even more so when you saw the lines waiting to get in (we didn’t have to wait, sometimes it pays to go on a tour). Got an unexpected treat when we happened to be there for the changing of the Guard with the Horse Guards and band.

Alfama on a Sunday morning

Tasting port at the fort (Torre de Belem)

Of course, we couldn’t be in Portugal without a trip to the holy Sanctuary of Fatima, which holds such a special place in the hearts of Catholics around the world. We enjoyed a private ride in a Mercedes Benz because the Bohemian is not a font of knowledge when it comes to navigating or what rules of the road apply in Portugal these days. The Sanctuary itself is impressive, with the Basilica of the Holy Trinity, the new church which holds thousands, and the path from the new church to the Basilica, where we saw pilgrims walking on their knees towards the Basilica. We also visited the home of the children who saw the apparition of the Virgin Mary. It was located on a narrow street, and, despite the amount of people, it was quiet and peaceful in the area where the children used to tend to their goats.

Lunch in Sintra, looks like an Australian Christmas dinner to me

We took the opportunity of a nice day to go visit Sintra, a favorite of the Portuguese royal family and noted artists such as Lord Byron. The Bohemian had kind of forgotten how far it was from the entrance to the Pena Palace, and being Portugal, of course, all uphill. While it was a hike, you are surrounded by a forest made up of exotic plants and trees. The palace itself is quite spectacular, but is actually outshone by the landscape.

Bohemian at what once was the end of the world

After Sintra, we had time to stop at Cabo do Roca, the westernmost point of the European continent. Windy, foggy (we could almost see the ocean) but nice to say we were at the most western edge of Europe. Also stopped at Boca do Inferno (the Devil’s Mouth); hard to explain it, but it was quiet the day we went. Then a leisurely stop in Cascais, where I once lived. Recognized the buildings, but they now held a lot of restaurants, and a whole lot more people. Ended the day with a drink in an Irish pub, and then made our way back to the hotel.

Walking up to Pena Palace

Day four found us on the train headed north to Porto, and what we found made us want to go back again. Easy to get around, history in abundance, food and wine second to none. Not a minute was wasted in this beautiful city. Without going through a minute by minute recap, what we found were churches everywhere: Se Porto and Sao Francisco in Porto, Sao Goncalo in Amarante. What you tend to notice is that the Portuguese really, really liked to gild everything in gold. It was almost overwhelming, especially in Sao Francisco which was built by the Franciscan order which fought against poverty. Lots of stories behind that. And there are very few places in Porto where you walk on flat ground; we did take a walk that led us straight downhill from central Porto to the river. We then walked across one of the six bridges spanning the Douro River to Gaia (or Villa Nova de Gaia), where all the port wine used to flow from Portugal to England. The riverfront in Gaia is filled with port wine cellars and lots of restaurants, and has a relaxed, friendly atmosphere. We had lunch at Dom Rodizio’s overlooking the Douro; I ordered a francesinha, a sandwich with enough meat and cheese in it to feed the entire population of western North Dakota. Pretty light dinner that night.

The Bohemian with his “franchesinha”

Can you be happier than this?

On our last day in Portugal, we ventured off to the Douro Valley; why hadn’t we been here before? Absolutely beautiful. Terraced vineyards everywhere, beautiful little towns (all with narrow, cobblestone streets), and the picturesque Douro flowing through. We had four gastronomic stops and four wine tasting stops. But I feel that the best wine I had on the entire tour was in a restaurant in Pinhal; the wine had no name, and the bottle had no label, but it led me to want to just hang out at that restaurant the rest of the day. A side story to this journey is that we ended up traveling with 6 Canadians, which now means we have holidayed with Canadians everywhere from the Cook Islands to Portugal! Oh, and the hotel we stayed at was in the heart of the Praca de Batalha; no streets, you just walked out of the door into a plaza with some great cafes.

Azuleijo in the Douro Valley

Everyone needs one of these

 

The Majestic Cafe, Porto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seven days in Portugal, could have done seventy. Certainly ranked amongst the best of vacations yet. Great wine, great cappuccino’s, great food, wonderful landscape, friendly people, the atmosphere was relaxed; what more could you ask for? All in all, it just The Bohemians anxious to start the next adventure. Bom dia, all.

QUICK RUN THROUGH THE UK

Mrs Bohemian and I finally decided our overseas trip this year would be the UK. Now, we’ve both been to England, but she has never visited Scotland. So it was on a Sunday morning we arrived in Heathrow to be greeted by a mile and a half walk to get through customs. One thing about the UK that I have discovered is, that no matter how many times you have been there, there is always something new to see and new stories to digest.

Diagon Alley

Hogwarts at night

 

One new thing we saw was the Warner Bros Studio Tour celebrating the making of the Harry Potter film series. We joined the first tour of the day with about 80 other people. Before we started the tour, a guide was going through the rules, the history of the tour, checking to see which house of Hogwarts everyone belonged to. Then he asked, “How many Harry Potter fans do we have?” Huge roar of 79 people. “How many people were dragged here under duress?” One person called out, “Here.” Sometimes I am in the minority. Loved the fact that the tour was self-paced, had places along the way to get water, etc., a nice cafe/restaurant halfway through the tour where you could get real butter beer. Not being a huge fan, I was impressed by a couple of the display areas. Number one was the set of the street where students could purchase their ‘wizard’ supplies. Of course, I now know that this is Diagon Alley, a point Mrs Bohemian ensured I knew so I didn’t embarass her. Amazing detail, colorful beyond description, and just a lot of fun. And then there was the scale model of Hogwarts. Hard to describe the work that had to go into this.

Just being in London is exciting, even on the seventh visit. The pubs are fascinating in that they keep the old-time, traditional feel. Most aren’t large at all; in fact, the bar in Sherwood, North Dakota, is about as big as many of them. But you have to visit places such as the Jeremy Bentham, or the Hung, Drawn and Quartered to feel the ambience. I have yet to be disappointed in the beer and food available. Touristy things, such as the night cruise on the Thames, are enjoyable, even on a cold night, on the open upper deck, with the seats dripping from an early rain shower. And just to make sure the Harry Potter experience hadn’t been forgotten, I dragged a hesitant (to say the least) Mrs Bohemian into the Imperial War Museum. All’s fair in love, war, and sightseeing.

Westminster at night

Then on to Scotland. I spent six years of my naval career in Scotland, and can never remember haggis being so popular. It was in virtually every restaurant, for every meal. Breakfast with haggis, hamburgers with haggis, pizza with haggis. Guess it is no longer restricted to being served at Rabbie Burns nights. We had decent weather as it rained only half the days we were there; of course, one of the times it rained coincided with us walking from Edinburgh Castle halfway down the Royal Mile. We got to see the usual things that draw tourists: the Scottish royal jewels, Mary Queen of Scots bedroom in Holyrood Palace. But most enjoyable of all was the trip around Loch Ness, legendary Glencoe, and the rugged beauty of the Highlands. I can say it was a lot better riding than driving. The boat trip on Loch Ness was not to miss; it didn’t go all that long, about an hour, but just being on Loch Ness and viewing Castle Urquhart from out on the water was priceless.

We left Edinburgh and spent a few nights in Perth, a great place if you want to go on the whiskey trail. Beautiful city, uncrowded at this time of year. We stayed at the Royal George hotel, built in 1763. It changed from the George Hotel to the Royal George after Queen Victoria spent a night there. Enjoyed some quiet time, just walking around, although we were lucky  enough to be there when they had free entry into museums, the old (really old) registry office was open for viewing, and got to tour the council chambers. Amazing to think of what we think of old here in the western U.S. is what Scots would consider the “new” buildings.

The Royal George,Perth

 

 

 

St Giles, Edinburgh

 

Eventually, we had to go home. But not after enjoying good times with old friends, fitting in fish ‘n chips as part of our temporary diet, experiencing the high speed train between London and Edinburgh, and creating new memories of our travels. And how did we feel about our whole trip….”

Until next time, The Smiling Bohemians

Mrs Bohemian and I finally decided our overseas trip this year would be the UK. Now, we’ve both been to England, but she has never visited Scotland. So it was on a Sunday morning we arrived in Heathrow to be greeted by a mile and a half walk to get through customs. One thing about the UK that I have discovered is, that no matter how many times you have been there, there is always something new to see and new stories to digest.

Diagon Alley

Hogwarts at night

 

One new thing we saw was the Warner Bros Studio Tour celebrating the making of the Harry Potter film series. We joined the first tour of the day with about 80 other people. Before we started the tour, a guide was going through the rules, the history of the tour, checking to see which house of Hogwarts everyone belonged to. Then he asked, “How many Harry Potter fans do we have?” Huge roar of 79 people. “How many people were dragged here under duress?” One person called out, “Here.” Sometimes I am in the minority. Loved the fact that the tour was self-paced, had places along the way to get water, etc., a nice cafe/restaurant halfway through the tour where you could get real butter beer. Not being a huge fan, I was impressed by a couple of the display areas. Number one was the set of the street where students could purchase their ‘wizard’ supplies. Of course, I now know that this is Diagon Alley, a point Mrs Bohemian ensure I knew so I didn’t embarass her. Amazing detail, colorful beyond description, and just a lot of fun. And then there was the scale model of Hogwarts. Hard to describe the work that had to go into this.

Just being in London is exciting, even on the seventh visit. The pubs are fascinating in that they keep the old-time, traditional feel. Most aren’t large at all; in fact, the bar in Sherwood, North Dakota, is about as big as many of them. But you have to visit places such as the Jeremy Bentham, or the Hung, Drawn and Quartered to feel the ambience. I have yet to be disappointed in the beer and food available. Touristy things, such as the night cruise on the Thames, are enjoyable, even on a cold night, on the open upper deck, with the seats dripping from an early rain shower. And just to make sure the Harry Potter experience hadn’t been forgotten, a dragged a hesitant (to say the least) Mrs Bohemian into the Imperial War Museum. All’s fair in love, war, and sightseeing.

Westminster at night

Then on to Scotland. I spent six years of my naval career in Scotland, and can never remember haggis being so popular. It was in virtually every restaurant, for every meal. Breakfast with haggis, hamburgers with haggis, pizza with haggis. Guess it is no longer restricted to being served at Rabbie Burns nights. We had decent weather as it rained only half the days we were there; of course, one of the times it rained coincided with us walking from Edinburgh Castle halfway down the Royal Mile. We got to see the usual things that draw tourists: the Scottish royal jewels, Mary Queen of Scots bedroom in Holyrood Palace. But most enjoyable of all was the trip around Loch Ness, legendary Glencoe, and the rugged beauty of the Highlands. I can say it was a lot better riding than driving. The boat trip on Loch Ness was not to miss; it didn’t go all that long, about an hour, but just being on Loch Ness and viewing Castle Urquhart from out on the water was priceless.

We left Edinburgh and spent a few nights in Perth, a great place if you want to go on the whiskey trail. Beautiful city, uncrowded at this time of year. We stayed at the Royal George hotel, built in 1763. It changed from the George Hotel to the Royal George after Queen Victoria spent a night there. Enjoyed some quiet time, just walking around, although we were lucky  enough to be there when they had free entry into museums, the old (really old) registry office was open for viewing, and got to tour the council chambers. Amazing to think of what we think of old here in the western US is what Scots would consider the “new” buildings.

The Royal George,Perth

 

 

 

St Giles, Edinburgh

 

Eventually, we had to go home. But not after enjoying good times with old friends, fitting in fish ‘n chips as part of our temporary diet, experiencing the high speed train between London and Edinburgh, and creating new memories of our travels. And how did we feel about our whole trip….”

Until next time, The Smiling Bohemians

A MORNING IN NOVEMBER

Just some thoughts as our 11th month draws nearer to a close.

My thoughts are with the Costa Ricans at this moment; for the first time in recorded history, a major tropical storm is set to strike the Caribbean coast. Mrs Bohemian and I spent some time there a few years ago, Puerto Viejo to be exact, and loved it. But the place is not set up to handle the ferocity of the impending storm. img_2345

Speaking of Mother Nature, saddened by the destruction caused by the recent earthquake centered around Kaikoura and Waiau in New Zealand. This is an area of understated beauty, and truly one of the more unique areas containing thermal springs, seals on the beach so close you can walk right up to them, the Kaikoura Ranges, and crayfish. As of this moment, business is slowly coming back, although a lot of infrastructure damage remains. One bright note, the U.S. Navy happened to be on hand and was able to assist in the evacuation of tourists and bringing in supplies to those stranded by the quake.

I hear that Donald Trump may have decided not to have his attorney general go after Hillary Clinton. If true, I applaud it. Of all the disturbing things that I heard during the election, the fact that a presidential candidate  and his supporters called for the incarceration of a political opponent was the worst. I served in the Navy for over twenty years to prevent things like this ever occurring in our great nation. The precedents for jailing a political rival are not pretty.

And sorry, but what’s all this crap about draining the swamp? Does that mean getting rid of lobby groups, such as the NRA and AMA? Good luck with that. What I really think it means is getting rid of the “establishment” politicians. Big mistake. Our nation, which is a great nation, was built largely by just such people. Thomas Jefferson was a career politician, Abraham Lincoln was a career politician, Theodore Roosevelt, among other things, was most certainly a career politician. Instead, we need Congress and whatever administration is holding office to refocus, get to work, and get rid of the obstructionism so prevalent since 2010.

So many of the restaurants we have enjoyed over the last ten or so years have been closing down. However, Mrs Bohemian introduced me to a little Argentinian empanada establishment on Broadway. Never have I tasted something made mostly with spinach taste so good.

Do people really buy their husband/wife a new car for Christmas? With all the holiday advertisements and sales we are being bombarded with from the car companies, I feel in the minority when I haven’t bought Mrs Bohemian a new Audi for Christmas.

And finally, freedom of speech is fine. But when that speech is about how the “white” race built this country, the line has been crossed. Does the “white” race include the Italians, who were hated when they came to the U.S.A. Does it include the Irish, who were not welcomed with open arms. What about Catholics? They were labeled as papists and not to be trusted.  If one bothers to read any credible history source, you will find amazing contributions by slaves and their descendants, by Native Americans both before and after the colonization period, by the Spanish and their Latino offspring, and pretty much every other racial/ethnic group. Those who chose not to read will be condemned by their ignorance.

 

 

 

At least that should be a headline after our last year. Many miles on Air New Zealand, Delta, United, and some airline in Guatemala I can’t even remember. Bank account doesn’t have a smiley face, but a hoard of memories that do include smiles were the end result.

It started with an unplanned trip to Dunedin, way down south in Otago, to see a friend, mentor, cousin by marriage, and a person who I have always leaned on for advice. She wasn’t doing too well when I got there, but the smile she gave me when I walked in the room made the entire trip worthwhile. Almost as much as the smile she had when Daughter Bohemian walked into the room a day later. Now as you can discern, this wasn’t a pleasure trip, but the time spent with June, her husband, and daughters was something I wouldn’t trade for anything. Nevertheless, I found that one can get a cappuccino almost anywhere in Dunedin, the Dunedin Botanical Gardens have a lot of hills, and it still rains as much as I remembered. We miss you, June, and Bill, so many thanks due to you for your hospitality and friendship. And I did make it back for our wedding anniversary.

Next stop was Raratonga in the Cook Islands, for what we thought was a perfect place to start a month-long holiday. And so it was. Beautiful weather, laid back atmosphere, some of the best calamari ever, and an outdoor shower in our room. We stayed at the Manuia Beach Resort (www.manuia.co.ck) and were not disappointed; perfect place right on the  beach with its perfect sand, warm water, great restaurant, etc..  But to be sure, be careful in the water as I was introduced to the damage coral can do to one’s shins. We found plenty to do: the cultural experience of Te Vara Nui Village, a three-hour long tour of the island, lazing around the pool, shopping, and watching the sun set over the ocean with a glass of wine; we even visited the prison. Perfect start to our journey.

 

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Manuia Beach Resort, Raratonga

Then it was on to Australia to see Daughter Bohemian, the Bohemian son-in-law, and the three little Australian  Bohemians. This was a special trip for Mrs Bohemian and for me, as it was the first Christmas she would spend with my daughter, and the first for me since 1998. It was great arriving in Coolangatta to the smiles of the kids; I forget that kids don’t stay little very long. What ensued was many days lunching on the beach or the park next to the beach, taking the kids to see some movie about talking chipmunks, a trip up to Mt Tambourine in the Gold Coast hinterlands, and, of course, me trying to keep from having to get involved in preparing Chistmas dinner. It was a tremendous two and a half weeks with the kids, and Mrs Bohemian proved she could beat a 12 year old at video games. We visited Dream World but managed to keep away from the “thrill” rides, had a few visits to the gym in which I learned I could no longer keep up with my daughter, and ate ice cream.

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Daughter Bohemian, Bohemian Son-in-Law with us

 

We finally had to leave Australia, but managed to fit in a few days in Auckland, New Zealand. Our gracious hosts were some old friends, him older than most. I found out that Auckland has a great train system, more hills than Dunedin, and that it is not necessarily as hot as this Bohemian would like, even in January. Besides enjoying the friendship and hospitality of our hosts, the Kiwi Dutchman did take us out to Waiheke Island, which we thoroughly enjoyed. Pleasant but cool/windy trip out on a ferry, but some great walking, great place to lunch at, and a visit to a winery with spectacular views of Auckland Harbor. We also got in some shopping for Kathmandu gear and a great lunch on the Auckland Viaduct, an area that impresses me more each time I visit.

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Kiwi Dutchman and Mr Bohemian

Guatemala was the destination in July; okay, so we picked the rainy season, but it was great other than the downpour on the day I was zip-lining outside Atitlan. We did this trip through Monograms (check out http://www.monograms.com) which was a first for me, but did it ever turn out great!! We had private transfers everywhere, private tours everywhere, and even when I did the aforementioned zip-lining, it was only the two guides and myself. We spent a couple of days in Antigua enjoying the feel of the ancient capitol, the amazing colonial architecture, the evidence of earthquake damage throughout the centuries, and the not-to-miss tour of a coffee plantation. Then it was on to Atitlan via Chichicastenango and its market; I don’t think this Bohemian will go to another market, ever. We traveled across Lake Atitlan with an amazing view of the twin-coned volcano that towers above the lake, a tour of the beautiful church of San Tiago de Atitlan, and, of course, a stop for a cappuccino. A long drive to Guatemala City with a one-night stay, and we were off to the Peten district and Tikal. I got to climb on the original stairs of a Mayan temple at Yax Na, we explored the ruins of Yax Ha, had a wonderful lunch consisting of a lot of black beans, fresh corn tortillas, and “pollo razon” (chicken coated with bread nut flour). Don’t quote me on that name. We had a couple of nights at the Hotel Camino Real Tikal, and trust me, the word “camino real” is only a suggestion. Anyway, the hotel was outstanding and we were right on the edge of a wildlife reserve, so got to hear those howler monkeys at their finest. The final day in the Peten area was spent at the ruins of Tikal, which no photographs can do justice to. The scope of the complex is amazing, especially viewed from the top of the largest temple. There can be a lot of walking involved, but Mrs Bohemian and I managed quite nicely. Then it was back to Guatemala City for the last night, which was partly spent watching Major League Baseball; I believe they have a lot of feeds from Mexican television stations. A truly memorable visit, an educational experience, and a great introduction to Mayan history and culture.

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Climbing the temple at Yax Na

The last trip of the year wasn’t quite as exotic: Sherwood, North Dakota. The Bohemian graduated from school there so it was the Class of **** School Reunion. Sad part is, the school closed its doors for good earlier in the year. But it is great to get back to one’s roots,  and important to link the past with the present. We partied at the Naked Moose, visited the old school, had layovers where they just happened to have cold  beverages. But most of all enjoyed each other’s company. It is not easy to describe the hold that my old hometown has over me: maybe it is the meadowlarks singing in the morning, or remembering those nights walking up to the house after a day in the field, or the camaraderie of playing football with your best friend. But for me, it was enjoying time with people that I grew up with, many of whom I shared twelve years of school, sports, and events in our lives that we can now laugh at. Thank you, Bohemian friends, I shall never forget you.

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Just a small part of the Class Reunion. The Naked Moose in Loraine, North Dakota

And so it went: enjoying dinner at a restaurant in the Dunedin area that had only enough red wine for one glass, gazing at the tropical sunset in Raratonga, New Year’s Eve fireworks over Burleigh Beach, fond farewells at the Auckland Airport, chicken buses in Guatemala, and bingo at the Mouse River Park. Travel truly is life.

 

FIRSTS

Just to get away from the elections, I wandered in my mind and recalled a few firsts in my life; nothing earth shattering, but many of the memories have smiles buried in them.

Such as my first Guiness. It was at an Australian pub in the Kowloon district of Hong Kong back in 1973. Waltzing Matilda’s was its name, and to us, a bunch of young sailors, it was magic. I guess I won my first game of darts at this place as well, but that is another story altogether.

Then there was the first time I met Mrs Bohemian at Denver International. My, we have been to a lot of airports since then, but never enjoyed an airport more than at that particular moment. And to think I almost missed getting to Denver when I fell asleep in the departure lounge at LAX.

The first time I bought a bottle of wine using my best French, it turned out to be something even a sailor wouldn’t drink. Have had better luck, but I was so proud of my find of a fine 2008 Cote du Rhone that I took a picture of my disaster.

Worst bottle of wine ever

The Bohemian discovering the meaning of life

The first time I was in a state other than  North Dakota was when I caught a bus to see my sister in Rock Springs, Wyoming. Didn’t go to Las Vegas, nor Beverly Hills, nor the Crescent City: it was Rock Springs, Wyoming. Never cease to amaze myself.

The first time I flew in a helicopter was during the evacuation of Viet Nam. The staff I was on wanted to relocate me from the USS Dubuque to the USS Denver, or something like that. There was skinny little me, with one other radioman, and a bunch of armed Marines. Big armed Marines.

The first, and only, wrestling match I ever won was in Tioga, North Dakota.

My first experience with zip lining was in Costa Rica, the Caribbean side. While I have done it since, this one was special because it was my first time, and it was with Mrs Bohemian, and it wasn’t raining.

The first half marathon I ran was in Dundee, Scotland. Forty five degrees fahrenheit, slight wind, lots of hills, and a sense of accomplishment.

The first time I baby sat for my oldest grand daughter was a near disaster. I did everything in the wrong order, such as when to feed, when to bathe, when to take her for a walk. I am probably no better at it now than I was then.

The first time I went jet boating in New Zealand, I managed to chose the wrong side of the boat to sit in. Trust me, it matters.

The first time I was in Paris, I managed to arrive without my tooth brush, tooth paste, shaving necessities, and the only warm clothes I had was an original “Starsky and Hutch” sweater that didn’t keep the January cold out, at all.

The first time I ever ordered fish with the head still on it was in Hendaye, France, near the Spanish border.

Until next time, The Smiling Bohemians

The Beaches at Sunset

In a quiet spot at the end of the world sits the Beaches Restaurant and Bar. Located in the Manuia Beach Resort in Raratonga, this restaurant offers everything from sand floors to amazing calamari to stunning sunsets. The restaurant ensured the free breakfast buffet was fully provisioned with fresh fruit, newly brewed coffee, and light-but-nourishing pancakes. The lunch menu was extensive, afternoon appetizers included the aforementioned calamari, and the dinner menu offered something new every night we were there.

The Beaches advertised  live entertainment one night, and while there were only four of us in the restaurant, it didn’t seem to bother the singer so why should it bother us?  After all, we were in RARATONGA enjoying the night air and Polynesia at its most relaxing finest.

 

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Sunset viewed from The Beaches Restaurant and Bar, Manuia Beach Resort, Raratonga

The staff are friendly, engaging, but never come close to smothering attention. Sitting there one night with some new-found friends from Calgary, we couldn’t bring ourselves to leave even when the 9:00pm closing hour hit. The staff ensured we were fortified with drink for another hour or so on the beach, making our last night in paradise one we would talk about for years to come.

For more on this destination, see   http://www.manuia.co.ck

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MARTHA’S VINEYARD

We hope you enjoy these photographs taken during the Family Reunion at Martha’s Vineyard, held to celebrate the 90th birthday of our mother, mother in law, and grandmother. Thank you Bruce and Toby for being such gracious hosts. Thank you Jake, Brett, Sam, Drew, and Nate for taking the time out of your busy lives to help us celebrate. Thank you Dale and Shelly, Neil and Debbie for traveling all the way to Boston. It isn’t easy finding great in laws, but we have managed to do so. So from Mrs Bohemian and me, the only one in the family who can’t play football, enjoy.

 

 

 

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Dale and Shelley on the Ferry

Must Have Been a Hard Night

Must Have Been a Hard Night

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Grandma on the Ferry

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Meeting Torrey

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Meeting the Dogs

Drew After Delivering a Vanload of Kaups

Drew After Delivering a Vanload of Kaups

Paradise

Paradise

Smiles All Around

Smiles All Around

Great Place to Relax

Great Place to Relax

Four Out of Five

Four Out of Five

Where's Our BBQ?

Where’s Our BBQ?

Dessert

Dessert

Jake and Toby

Jake and Toby

Jake Loving the BBQ

Jake Loving the BBQ

Big Brother Bruce and Little Dale

Big Brother Bruce and Little Dale

Baron Has Something Important to Say

Baron Has Something Important to Say

Drew Helping Out

Drew Helping Out

Better Than Using Dad's Shovel

Better Than Using Dad’s Shovel

Buddy Likes Grandma

Buddy Likes Grandma

Dr B

Dr B

Beautiful Garden

Beautiful Garden

Grandma Checkin' Out the Beach

Grandma Checkin’ Out the Beach

Relaxing At the Beach

Relaxing At the Beach

Sam Dreaming of Costa Rica

Sam Dreaming of Costa Rica

Beach Life

Beach Life

Kent at the Beach

Kent at the Beach

Big Baby

Big Baby

More Relaxing

More Relaxing

Little Baby

Little Baby

Beautiful Garden #3

Beautiful Garden #3

Beautiful Garden #4

Beautiful Garden #4

Ahh, Coffee

Ahh, Coffee

Relaxing

Relaxing

Grandma, too

Grandma, too

Farmer's Market

Farmer’s Market

Farmer's Market #2

Farmer’s Market #2

Farmer's Market #3

Farmer’s Market #3

Telegraph Hill

Telegraph Hill

Checking Out the Sites

Checking Out the Sites

Beautiful Garden #5

Beautiful Garden #5

Grandma Posing

Grandma Posing

Checking Out the Flowers

Checking Out the Flowers

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1

2

2

3

3

4

4

Anticipation

Anticipation

Picking Sides

Picking Sides

Dale Upping His Score

Dale Upping His Score

Waiting for Dinner

Waiting for Dinner

The Black Dog

The Black Dog

Black Dog

Black Dog

Bruce Waiting for His Ship to Come In

Bruce Waiting for His Ship to Come In

Age Before Beauty

Age Before Beauty

Torrey's In Heaven

Torrey’s In Heaven

Bruce's Best Friend

Bruce’s Best Friend

Hey, Someone Let Me In

Hey, Someone Let Me In

Baron Protecting Bruce

Baron Protecting Bruce

At the Pub

At the Pub

Where's The Food!!

Where’s The Food!!

Yes, Dale

Yes, Dale

Interesting

Interesting

A Night at the House

A Night at the House

Drinks at Donovan's Reef

Drinks at Donovan’s Reef

Enjoying Life

Enjoying Life

Mmmm, Seafood

Mmmm, Seafood

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Heyyyy

Aren't We Cute??

Aren’t We Cute??

A Day in the World

A neighbor turns a blind eye,

A civil war begins;

A mugging goes unnoticed,

Dying with no friends.

 

Racism raises ugly head,

Riots, screams and fire;

Children going unfed

And clothed in ragged attire.

 

Employer takes advantage

Of youthful will to work;

Another drunken driver,

Gunman goes beserk.

 

An arsonist starts a fire,

Husband rejects wife;

Tragedy strikes at sea,

Teenager takes his life.

 

But is it all so gloomy?

Is there nothing right this day?

Are we here for only blackness

Like a dreary, dismal day?

 

Then….

A man discovers Shakespeare,

Someone visits Bath;

A fireworks display,

Child learns his math.

 

A ceasefire and some peace talks,

People meet halfway;

Two girls find a new friend

And smile as they play.

 

A youth returns a wallet,

Elections fairly held;

Harmony ‘mongst neighbors,

It’s peaceful on the veld.

 

Young couple pay their home off,

Research finds a cure;

A loving pair do marry

And glows show in the mirror.

 

I now walk down the pleasant path

With fingers cold and curled;

And get a nice warm feeling,

All’s not bad in this funny world.

KK

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